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Compilations - Issue 587

DJ Haus Enters the Unknown Vol. 2

Various

DJ Haus Enters the Unknown Vol. 2

Unknown To The Unknown

More than your typical label showcase More than your typical label showcase More than your typical label showcase
8.0
As far as label showcases go, DJ Haus definitely goes above the call of duty with his ‘Enters the Unknown’ series. The second edition boasts a checklist that's swelling to exploding. More than 40 tracks spread across three CDs and two mixes (plus a vinyl-only sampler for the heads); a retrospective look at the last twelve months of both his imprints; a selection of sleeper B-sides; a healthy slew of exclusives from the likes of Legowelt and DJ Seinfeld; and above all else, a genuinely impressive spectrum of records that cover off house, techno, electro and beyond. It’s the latter point where ‘Enters the Unknown’ impresses the most, with everyone from DJ Stingray to Kornél Kovács making an appearance, itself a great indication of well it traverses electro and disco with equal aplomb. A suitable benchmark for label showcases.
Angus Paterson
Kode9 & Burial

Kode9 & Burial

FABRICLIVE 100

fabric

Final page plot twist
7.0
You could practically hear the internet shaking when Kode9 and Burial – two giants of the UK underground – were announced as the brains to bow out the FABRICLIVE mix series. Many will secretly be hoping for this to somehow be ‘The Ultimate’ FABRICLIVE, but – thankfully – the final instalment doesn’t try to fulfil any grand ambitions. It’s an intriguing, spacious and occasionally pretty weird mix that bounces around without any real regard for continuity, meaning that it covers a lot of ground in its 74 minutes: rave, jungle, footwork, electro, gqom and hardcore are all stop-offs (spoiler alert: there’s no dubstep), interspersed with moody ambience. There are, of course, some superb tracks here, from a roster featuring DJ Rashad, Cooly G, DJ Spinn and Scratcha DVA (Hyperdub – Kode9’s label and Burial’s spiritual home – is a primary talent source), alongside lesser-known belters from Clementine, Jungle Buddha and others, plus a glorious rush of glitzy, opinion-dividing electro from Luke Slater. Despite future-facing sounds, the deliberately unpolished nature of the mix gives the whole thing an old-school feel, which works to its advantage. But the frenetic genre-hopping and interludes mean that things are a little too disjointed to provide a show-stopping mix. However, it’s still a lot of fun and a fine final salute.
Tristan Parker
TAKE ME A_PART, THE REMIXES

Kelela

TAKE ME A_PART, THE REMIXES

Warp

Pick up the pieces
7.0
Since Kelela’s ‘Take Me Apart’ album often suggested a woman not to be messed with, it’s understandable that many of the artists the American R&B artist has asked to literally take it apart have left her voice as the star. But her rich, buttery tones are now spread across a wider variety of beats from a diverse crew of worldwide remixers, covering sub-driven gqom rhythms through to radio-friendly soul, with occasional extra vocals thrown in from the likes of Princess Nokia. The collection’s range is demonstrated by two versions of ‘Waitin’’: in Nathaniel W James and Dave Quam’s hands the original’s futuristic R&B becomes an ambient lullaby, whilst Tre Oh Fie beefs up the bass and breakbeats. It’s inevitably more of a cut-up collage than the masterpiece the album was, but while no-one’s really bettered the source material, nor has anyone made a total mess.
Paul Clarke