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Compilations - Issue 600

Uncovered 2008-2018 Vol. 1-3

Peter Van Hoesen

Uncovered 2008-2018 Vol. 1-3

Time To Express
9.0
Belgian producer Peter Van Hoesen may be known for his spelunking psychedelic techno, but as his new three-part compilation ‘Uncovered 2008-2018’ proves, he’s a versatile artist with myriad moods at his disposal. Since the launch of his Time To Express label in 2008, he’s explored all kinds of musical terrain. ‘Vol. 1’ traverses ambient ground, with abstract crackles and sibilant tones providing plenty of brain food. ‘Ang Session 1014’ places murky bass synth amid a beatless backdrop, and seems about to erupt into a dance track at any minute. ‘Attribute39’ is especially good, with its off-world, spine-tingling melody and pad swirl. On ‘Vol. 2’ (all slower BPMs), ‘Casual Care Dub V’ resounds to a cavernous atmosphere and heads-down techno claps and hats; ‘Sky Ruptures’ is dreamy house with arps spinning off into infinity. Van Hoesen reserves his slam jams for ‘Vol. 3’, like the superbly moody electro of ‘Certosa’. Still, on ‘Place Of Emergence’, his knack for a mystical aura is intact amid the thumping kicks. Van Hoesen’s great skill is weaving psychotropic sensations through his rhythmic pieces, but it’s the variety of his work that is most impressive. ‘Uncovered’ is a compelling overview of an underrated artist.
Ben Murphy
Blanc Manioc presents Nyamakala Beats #1

Various Artists

Blanc Manioc presents Nyamakala Beats #1

Blanc Manioc

Adventurous Malian rhythmic electronics
9.0
Given the nightmare of colonialism, it’s jarring that Europe’s unforgiving histories with various nations has led to creative links now responsible for fantastic things. Blanc Manioc’s output is one of them. Born between Bamako, Mali, and Lyon, France, this debut compilation showcasing the young label’s best is testament to the deep ties that remain, and the high standard of its artists. Casting a quick ear over ‘Nyamakala Beats #1’ unearths everything from slo-mo tribal acid rollers (‘Douga’ by Ko Saba) and heads down minimalism (Praktika & Dom Peter’s ‘TamaLyon’), to bouncy kuduro rap (MC Waraba & Meleke Tchatcho) and the uniquely Malian balani — a kind of bossa nova and broken, percussive house mutant spawned from the country’s capital, and its emerging electronic club culture. An aural guidebook to a nation known for its innovative approach to musical experiments and performance.
Martin Guttridge-Hewitt
Detroit Love Vol. 3

Waajeed

Detroit Love Vol. 3

Planet E

Groovy love letter to Detroit
8.0
Founder member of Slum Village alongside J Dilla, Waajeed is a hip-hop artist who converted to 4/4 well before Kanye West started spinning house music at his Sunday Service. The Detroit native runs the Dirt Tech Reck label, alongside releasing his own gritty house tracks on Carl Craig’s Planet E imprint, and now helms the latest in the ‘Detroit Love’ series, showcasing his hometown’s ever-fertile sound. Tight in mixing but loose in groove, Waajeed’s selection features tracks like D-Love Muzic’s ‘Celestrial’, which occasionally touch Craig’s sci-fi techno. But Tall Black Guy’s ‘Coffee Room’ has a similar jazzy shuffle to Waajeed’s sometime collaborator Theo Parrish, and there’s also Damon Bell and Camille Safiya’s Afro-infused ‘Mermaid Blues’, the broken beats of Joss Moog’s ‘196’, and Patrice Scott’s deeply funky ‘The Detroit Upright’ before the pumping climax of Preslav’s ‘Achey Breaky’, making this compilation a broad church.
Paul Clarke