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Poll 2020: Above & Beyond

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Above & Beyond
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To celebrate every 50 episodes of their Group Therapy radio show, London-based trance trio Above & Beyond organised a spectacular live show. Due to the pandemic, for their 400th edition, they were compelled to host a virtual event, which they live-streamed from a boat on the River Thames via Twitch. With live events shut down, it offered another way to stay in touch with their legion of loyal fans and was composed mostly of classic tracks to mark 20 years of their Anjunabeats label.


In addition to “taking a welcome forced break from touring and catching up on other aspects of life,” Above & Beyond used the downtime to get back in the studio. After their last record ‘Flow State’ found the group exploring ambient music, they’re diversifying their sound again, working on a film score for the first time. This year, they also released a host of singles, including ‘Reverie’ featuring longtime collaborator Zoë Johnston, and a cover of evergreen New Order classic ‘Blue Monday’, which found fresh mileage in its already trance-like arpeggio bassline. Considering how productive they’ve already been in 2020, there’re bound to be more tunes before the year is out.

 

What three things have most helped you through Coronavirus Lockdown? 

“Writing music, cooking, cycling/exercise.”


What lessons should the industry learn from this crisis? 

“Nothing lasts forever, and don’t take anything for granted.”

 

What steps need to be taken to address the racism in the dance music scene? 

“Using music to bring people who disagree together is the key, as is the case historically with many movements.”

 

What industry changes are you personally pushing for to make the dance music scene more inclusive? 

“The whole approach from Anjunabeats and A&B has been about inclusivity from the beginning. We won’t rest on our laurels, however, and will try and further diversify our artist roster on our labels.”

 

What’s the greatest dance music track of all time? 

“This is a problem in our industry — the obsession with ranking and rating things, and it certainly doesn’t help at all with inclusivity or foster an environment to promote true artistic expression.”

Questions Top100 DJs 2004 - Becca Antoon - 2020-10-20 10:37

Style: 
“Trance/progressive/Anjunadeep.”
Best known for: 
“Group Therapy.”
Tune of the year: 
“Nox Vahn & Marsh ‘Come Together’.”

Poll 2020: Hardwell

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Hardwell
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In January, previous two-time Top 100 DJs poll winner Hardwell put out 'The Story Of Hardwell', a 25-track 2xCD and a 12-track luxury double-vinyl ‘best of’ album. At the time the Dutch EDM icon said, “With the arrival of a new decade, I’ve been reflecting on my career and many of my singles, which ones stand out, and which ones hold a deeper meaning to me, and you. The tracks that have such a big story behind them or which have been career-defining for me.”
 
As such, it is jam-packed with original edits and extended mixes that show off the full spectrum of his sound. There are earth-shattering sonics on ‘Spaceman’ — one of the biggest tunes of the 2010s — as well as now-legendary collaborations with kingpins like Tiësto, Armin van Buuren, KSHMR and Wildstylez, plus the inclusion of mega-hits like ‘I'm Not Sorry’ with Mike Williams.
 
He might no longer be touring, having taken an indefinite hiatus in 2018 “for personal reflection and to focus on more studio time”, but he does regularly update his personal playlists and continues to put out episodes of his radio show, Hardwell On Air, each week.

Questions Top100 DJs 2004 - Becca Antoon - 2020-10-20 10:28

Style: 
"Hardwell style"
Best known for: 
"Going on an indefinite touring hiatus "

Poll 2020: Marshmello

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Marshmello
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Last year's Top DJs poll profile labelled Marshmello unique, ambitious, daring, and sometimes quite absurd. While 2020 might have stifled the helmet-wearing megastar's globetrotting tour of the world's biggest stages, it hasn't hindered him delivering a compelling selection of releases. 'Been Thru This Before’, dropped in April, is a star-studded collaboration with Atlanta trap royalty, Southside, UK rap royalty, Giggs, and Brooklyn rap royalty, Saint John. Much like the 42 Dugg-featuring single, 'Baggin', it's a raw trap cut that strips away much of the pop sensibilities of Marshmello’s previous work — even if it does continue to showcase his impeccable ear for a mello-dy (geddit?).
 
With a series of tracks that includes two cuts on emo-rap star Juice Wrld's posthumous 'Legends Never Die' album, Marshmello teased that his fourth long-player, 'Joytime IV', is coming "verrryyy sooooonnn" in a social media post in July. This year, Marshmello also opened up his Joytime Collective label — which he has previously used to release his own material — to support young producers, with an EP from 19-year-old Indonesian producer, Papa Khan, landing in October. If there's one thing consistent in Marshmello's wide-reaching career, it's his ability to keep his fans, lovingly referred to as the Mellogang, continually guessing.
 

Questions Top100 DJs 2004 - Becca Antoon - 2020-10-20 10:25

Style: 
Future bounce
Best known for: 
His dazzling smile

Poll 2020: Timmy Trumpet

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Timmy Trumpet
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Timothy Jude Smith, the Australian DJ, producer and musician better known as Timmy Trumpet has finally cracked the top ten in 2020’s Top 100 DJs poll. He's been on an upward trajectory for a few years now, steadily moving up each year from No.75 in 2016 to this year’s top ten rankings. In that time, he’s become infamous for his full-on, no-holds-barred performances, high-energy delivery and of course for his live trumpet skills – he’s actually an accomplished musician who has been playing his instrument since he was four and was Australian Young Musician of the Year at the age of 13.
 
Timmy Trumpet first broke big with his twelfth release, the luminescent ear-worm ‘Freaks’ featuring rapper Savage in 2015. ‘Freaks’ went on to blow up internationally, garnering hundreds of millions of streams and going multi-platinum, propelling Mr Trumpet into the upper echelons of the global EDM high rollers and massive-festival circuit.
 
He’s since maintained a prolific recorded output on labels like Spinnin’, Armada, Ultra Music and Ministry Of Sound including collaboration with the likes of Carnage, KSHMR and Hardwell. Timmy can turn his hand to a number of styles and although he is best known for boshing electro-house and hardstyle, he’s also successfully dabbled with psytrance and hip-hop too. 
 
Pre pandemic, Timmy maintained a crazy global tour schedule and had spent much of last year on his 60-date ‘World At Our Feet' tour, taking in clubs, festivals and events in North and South America, Europe and all over Asia. As a DJ, he’s played main stage sets at pretty much every large EDM event you can name including Electric Love, Creamfields, Airbeat One, Tomorrowland, Electric Daisy Carnival, Rio Music Carnival and many more. 
 
However, 2020 for Timmy Trumpet has been all about production as he’s continued to turn out banger after banger, including collabs with Charlott Boss, Ghost, STARX, Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike with ’The Anthem’, and with The Toneshifterz on ‘Fuck Yeah’. He’s also released a series of originals and remixes too, including a few tracks with lyrics that reflect the current global situation: “This year has been about making music that speaks to and for my fans, who I call family, who I’ve become closer to more than ever before. Tracks like ‘Mars’, ‘Diamonds’, and ‘The Prayer’ all relate to what we were going through.”

It’s clearly been a productive time for Timmy as come the end of the year, he’ll be delivering his fans a Christmas present in the shape of his first-ever full-length album: “I’m about to drop my debut artist album ‘Mad World’ this December as an ode to this year and the crazy rollercoaster that is 2020,” he says.
 
 
What three things have most helped you through Coronavirus Lockdown? 
 
“My friends and family, the connection I have with my fans, and the amazing gift of gratitude that my parents instilled in me. So many people are suffering and unable to escape the effects of the pandemic. My heart goes out to the heroes of 2020.”
 
 
What lessons should the industry learn from this crisis?
 
“That playing music for a living is a privilege and should always be respected and NEVER taken for granted. We have the best job in the world and not just because we play music — because we travel the world and connect with people.”
 
 
What steps need to be taken to address the racism in the dance music scene? 
 
“Listen, learn and try to understand how we got here and where we need to be. Music has the ability to bring people together and unite people of all cultures.”
 
 
What industry changes are you personally pushing for to make the dance music scene more inclusive?
 
“One thing this pandemic and technology has taught us is that the entire world is one live stream or video call away from connecting on a deeper level through music. We need to continue to find new ways to bridge the gap between our cultures and make dance music available to everyone, not just the people who can afford to buy tickets.”
 
 
What’s the greatest dance music track of all time? 
 
“Robert Miles ‘Children’.”

 

Questions Top100 DJs 2004 - Becca Antoon - 2020-10-20 10:22

Style: 
“No rules, no boundaries.”
Best known for: 
“Drinking trumpet and playing vodka.”
Tune of the year: 
"Joel Corry x MNEK ‘Head & Heart’.”

Poll 2020: Steve Aoki

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Steve Aoki
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Steve Aoki is a man of many talents. His label Dim Mak has been championing a smear of genres, covering punk, indie, hardcore and EDM since its inception in 1996. Artists like Bloc Party, The Gossip, Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike, Zedd and The Kills have all benefited from Aoki’s golden A&R ear, while his hyperactive entrepreneurial spirit turned the Dim Mak brand into a merch and live event powerhouse. As a DJ and performer, he’s become infamous for his cake-chucking antics, launching various baked treats into gleeful fans’ faces at gigs around the world. 
 
With the release of his ‘Neon Future IV’ album in April 2020, Aoki was primed to take off on an epic tour titled The Color Of Noise, alongside friends and collaborators Timmy Trumpet, Deorro, Riot Ten and more. Of the album, Aoki told us last year: “It’s similar to the previous ‘Neon Future’ albums, in that it’s heavily weighted on collabs across genres. I will have features with people that have inspired the way I think about the world and the future. There’s more songs on this one, and some unexpected features as well.” 
 
Those collaborators include The Backstreet Boys, will.i.am, Alan Walker, Ummet Ozcan, Bassjackers, Showtek, Sting and more, a list as varied as Aoki’s own business ventures. Back in 2018, he opened his own pizza restaurant in LA, following in the footsteps of his restauranteur father Hiroaki Aoki, founder of Japanese cuisine chain Benihana’s. 
 
He’s also deeply philanthropic, having worked with and donated to countless charities over the years, including starting his own Aoki Foundation, “supporting organisations in the brain science and research areas with a specific focus on regenerative medicine and brain preservation”. Their noble and ambitious aim is to “one day see a world where degenerative brain diseases do not exist”. His Mindfulness Marathon eight-day livestream event inspired millions around the world over this summer’s lockdown and beyond. Guests included meditation, sleep and memory experts, discussing ways in which we can tap into our minds and develop a cognitive relationship with ourselves that can help us later in life in order to, what Aoki calls, #SaveTheBrain. 
 
While the year might not have turned out as expected for DJs, or indeed any of us, calls for inclusivity within our industry have only grown over 2020. We asked Steve what steps need to be taken to address the racism in the dance music scene. “Dialogue and communication are the best first steps,” he said. “And at a deeper level, festival promoters taking a stance to make an effort to book a more diverse line-up to play their stages.”

As well as looking outwardly, Aoki is also taking positive steps within his own imprint: “With Dim Mak, we make an effort to hire more people of colour and women at our company. Collaborating with a diverse demographic of artists from all walks of life not only makes the music that we make more unique and interesting, but it opens the doors to new sounds and genres.”
 
 
What three things have most helped you through Coronavirus Lockdown?
 
“Ice baths, meditation and sleep.”
 
 
What lessons should the industry learn from this crisis?
 
“That climate change is not a hoax, and Covid-19 isn't created by 5G.”
 
 
What’s the greatest dance music track of all time?
 
“‘Sandstorm’.”
 

Questions Top100 DJs 2004 - Becca Antoon - 2020-10-20 10:19

Style: 
“Multifaceted.”
Best known for: 
“EDM.”
Tune of the year: 
“‘Dreams’ by Fleetwood Mac.”

Poll 2020: Don Diablo

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Don Diablo
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Don Diablo holds fast at No.6 and once again claims the Highest Future House gong for his efforts. When he graced the cover of our North American magazine last year, we found out how Don’s life has been one of major ups and downs. When he was very young, doctors told his parents that young Don wouldn’t live past the age of 10. As he got older and music became his clear career path, Don was repeatedly messed about and screwed over by shady figures in the industry. And then, several years ago, his father died. Don was ready to give up, but the words of encouragement his dad gave him the last time they spoke inspired Don to carry on and do him proud. 
 
Taking control of his own destiny, Don now sits at the head of a dance music empire: he’s not only a DJ and producer, but also runs his HEXAGON label, which has its own events and management divisions, and signature clothing line. 
 
And he hasn’t let 2020 slow him down either. When we ask what Don has been getting up to, he gives us a huge list of projects in response (and we suspect there’s a whole load more he’s keeping under wraps for now too). Don finished off renovating his amazing house — formerly a church — and filmed an MTV Cribs special there. He also live-streamed sets from home, including from his bedroom, Star Wars-themed swimming pool and… err… toilet. He designed and released a new line for his Hexagon fashion brand, launched a Hexagon comic book series, and is in the process of co-writing a book set to be released next year. 
 
Don also created an art installation for the city of Amsterdam and became the musical director for a play which highlighted the mental health issues faced by many musicians. And fans will be happy to know he’s finally on the cusp of finishing his third album, ‘FOREVER’. Oh yeah, and on top of all that, he’s also now an amateur magician. Not bad for a year that’s seemingly tried to stop musicians from progressing at every turn.
 
 
What three things have most helped you through Coronavirus Lockdown?
 
“More quality time with close family and friends. More time to work on my physical and mental health. More time than ever to work and experiment in the studio, as well as the possibility to properly explore other creative passions next to creating music.”

 

What steps need to be taken to address the racism in the dance music scene?
 
“Communication, honesty and self-reflection would be a good start.”

 

What industry changes are you personally pushing for to make the dance music scene more inclusive?
 
“With my HEXAGON label and radio show we try to actively support unknown artists from all around the globe with very diverse backgrounds as much as possible.”

 

What’s the greatest dance music track of all time?
 
“Moby ‘Feeling So Real’.”

 

Questions Top100 DJs 2004 - Becca Antoon - 2020-10-20 10:10

Style: 
“Future.”
Best known for: 
“Creating a HEXAGON-shaped universe.”
Tune of the year: 
“Madeon ‘No Fear No More’.”

Poll 2020: Alok

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Alok
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“I don't think I've made it,” says ALOK rather humbly, despite placing so highly in this year's poll. “This is a recognition for all Brazilians and Brazilian artists. I hope I can be a ray of light to those people who believe that their art can take them above, as that is why I keep taking my beats out into the world — to wake up the positivity and good choices in the people who feel them.”
 
This year has been a big one for him both personally and privately: his first son was born, his wife is pregnant for a second time, and he is officially the second biggest electronic artist on Instagram, as well as hosting the biggest live stream of 2020, which trended at No.1 globally on Twitter. He was the first-ever DJ in his homeland to be aired on prime time, which has very much opened a new dimension for electronic music in the country. It has been a booming scene for a while, but right now it has never been hotter, which is part of the reason why ALOK started CONTROVERSIA, a label on which he has signed up a wealth of new talent in the last year. 
 
“I want to push talent and give them the extra support needed to get recognised,” says the 29-year-old, who this year made his first foray into the gaming world when he was invited by Garena to become a Free Fire character. “As a player, it is crazy to see me as a character with superpowers. Also, part of the profit from the sale is converted to socio-educational projects.”
 
In the studio, he has decided recently that less is more. “I'm using things that break formulas a little bit, are experimental and new. As there is no face-to-face party, you end up being able to make more visceral music, without thinking too much about rocking the dancefloor. Sounds that may be more introspective, not really thinking about how it will resonate in the clubs.”
 
One such tune this year was “very special” to Alok. 'It's Don't Say Goodbye' was created with Turkish mega-talent Ilkay Sencan and features Sweden’s Tove Lo too. “She got very excited about the song and wanted to give her own twist to it. We loved what she did. Still get goosebumps every time, listening to the record,” he says.
 
The enforced downtime that has come as a result of the global pandemic has been great for ALOK, who has had the pleasure of “really witnessing first-hand my son Ravi growing. It's happening so fast but I am so blessed with such a great family around me.” It's had such an impact that ALOK even admits, “I have definitely decided to tour a lot less when touring will kick-start again, and definitely take my family around with me. For me, family is the most important thing in life.”
As well as promising lots of new music and collaborations that will continue to blow up his Brazilian bass sound, ALOK explains his philosophy is drawn from a famous Bruce Lee quote. “We should have the same ability water has, to flow, to adapt.” That is certainly a mantra this ever-evolving artist lives by. 
 
 
What three things have most helped you through Coronavirus Lockdown?
 
“My family, studio and game streaming.”
 
 
What lessons should the industry learn from this crisis?
 
“It takes so many people to put up one show and many of them work in silence and behind the scenes. This crisis has brought into perspective how important these people are to the industry itself.”
 
 
What steps need to be taken to address the racism in the dance music scene?
 
“Within the reality that is structural racism, the important thing is to open space for these questions to be answered by people who are truly representative voices on the issue. We want them to show us what is relevant in this discussion.”
 
 
What industry changes are you personally pushing for to make the dance music scene more inclusive?
 
“Last year, I did a show with an interpreter next to me translating the lyrics into Brazilian Sign Language (also known as Libras). It was a true connection!”
 
 
What’s the greatest dance music track of all time?
 
“David Guetta ‘Titanium’."

 

Questions Top100 DJs 2004 - Becca Antoon - 2020-10-20 10:06

Style: 
“Brazilian bass.”
Best known for: 
“'Hear Me Now’, ‘Piece Of Your Heart (Alok Remix)’.”
Tune of the year: 
“Frey, Sway Gray ‘Wir Sind Nicht Allein feat. Felix Rauber’.”

Poll 2020: Armin Van Buuren

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Armin Van Buuren
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With its titular musing on that old work/life deal, Armin’s 2019 ‘Balance’ album might just have been a year ahead of its time. Before the big stay-home kicked in however Armin did manage a ‘Balance’ bus tour Stateside, squeezing 12 shows into a daunting-to-most 14 days. With scarce pause, that put him toe-to-toe with the biggest (not to mention last) trance gathering of 2020: ASOT950 at Utrecht’s Jaarbeurs arena.

Corona was but a whisper there, but within a month he was looking at considerably more out-of-the-booth time than even ‘Balance’ alluded to. By and large though it seems like the Dutch giant’s simply reinvested his tireless energies into other parts of the Armin operation. 
 
Unsurprisingly, foremost amongst them was the one still wide open to all: music production. Even by his usual prodigious annual standards, Armin upticked, and most noticeably on the local collab side. June saw ‘Tarzan’ with the Blasterjaxx boys swing in, while his Nicky Romero-teaming ‘I Need You To Know’ popped up a month later. With ‘The Voice’, planet trance cheered another return for his Rising Star moniker, which – after its epic 2002-2015 layoff – might just become a yearly staple again. A rising star of a different variety, he and his best-newcomer pick AVIRA followed their ‘Hollow’ & ‘Illusion’ releases with some more deeper trance ether in the form of ‘Mask’. Most recently Armin’s been in the studio with X-Factor winner (and another fellow countryman) Jake Reese for his latest outing, ‘Need You Now’.

Longform project ideas have also either been moved up the to-do list or introduced wholesale to fit the prevailing circumstance. High summer’s ‘The Lost Tapes’ saw Armin marshal a clutch of reworks of his own material onto an album. Commenting at the time, he said: “I’ve had the pleasure of welcoming lots of amazing remixes of my tracks throughout the years, many of which I’ve been playing extensively in my live sets. To make sure they won’t get lost in time, I’ve launched this album full of ‘Lost Tapes’.” Likely soothing many a frayed fan nerve, that was prefaced by May’s ‘RELAXED’ LP, which saw him handpick chillout variations of old and not-so Armin fare.

Armin made it as much business as usual for his annual compilation offerings as possible this year. ‘A State Of Trance 2020’ brought a fitting conclusion to his ASOT950 festivities. While Ibiza remained largely and depressingly under the dustsheets, ‘ASOT Ibiza’ brought a taste of what would have been for the season. 
 
One place that Armin continues to make flux, however, is in the formatting of his A State Of Trance radio show. In the summer he announced he was shifting emphasis (and airtime) to the future of trance, with sizeable chunks of the show being handed over to newer-comers. In another first, he also announced the first ‘ASOT residency’, with Ferry Corsten taking the reins for an hour a month. Announcing the move, Armin said: “Ferry and I have a history that’s been going on for a long, long time. He, of course, through his Flashover Recordings label, wants to promote new talent as well, so I thought, why not give him a monthly residency in A State Of Trance? And that’s what we’ve been testing these last couple of months.”

“Last but not least, I’m counting down to ASOT1000”, says Armin. While the exact form has yet to be announced, proceedings are confirmed to conclude with an Armin x Ferry back-to-back vinyl set. A Tiësto appearance, however (as some web-wags posited last April 1st) remains unconfirmed at this time!
 
 
What three things have most helped you through Coronavirus Lockdown? 
 
“Gaming, meditating and cooking.”

 
What lessons should the industry learn from this crisis? 
 
“Never take anything for granted.”
 

What steps need to be taken to address the racism in the dance music scene? 
 
“Make people aware that it’s a serious issue.”
 

What industry changes are you personally pushing for to make the dance music scene more inclusive? 
 
“I’m an ambassador for WWF and support the fight against plastic pollution.”

 
What’s the greatest dance music track of all time? 
 
“L.S.G. ‘Netherworld (Jules Verne mix)’.”
 

Questions Top100 DJs 2004 - Becca Antoon - 2020-10-20 10:02

Style: 
“Trance and progressive.”
Best known for: 
“A State Of Trance.”
Tune of the year: 
“Scorz feat. Diana Leah ‘Come To Life’.”

Poll 2020: Martin Garrix

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Martin Garrix
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Martin Garrix continues an incredible run of form in the Top 100 DJs poll, with his No.3 spot marking the seventh year that he’s maintained in the top five — having been top three for the past five years — since first entering the chart in 2013. Following last year’s results, the 24-year-old Dutchman was announced as the official music artist of EURO2020, following in the footsteps of David Guetta, who delivered the official music for EURO2016. In March, in the closing episode of season four of The Martin Garrix Show, Garrix was shown working alongside composer and pianist Giorgio Tuinfort as a symphony recorded the music they wrote together for the tournament. It would, unfortunately, be delayed until June 2021 due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, but it demonstrates the incredible heights the young Dutchman continues to push in his career.
 
In June, Garrix also revealed his newly refurbished STMPD studio complex. The new facility, which has been under refurbishment for the past three years, has already welcomed the likes of Young Thug, Big Sean, and One Republic. The new complex has a 360-degree approach, with music, film and advertising all catered for across multiple studios, making it what he describes as “the most advanced studio complex in The Netherlands”.
 
Despite the coronavirus pandemic putting a stopper to live shows across the world, fans have still been able to access some big performances from Garrix, with him playing a set from the rooftop of the A’Dam Tower for the 2020 King’s Day celebrations, and Tomorrowland’s digital festival. “I loved playing the sets even though it was very different without an audience, of course,” he tells DJ Mag. “It at least gave me the feeling of being on stage again. I really miss that.”
 
Speaking about what he’s been doing during lockdown, Garrix explains that he’s “been making loads and loads of new music”, and it’s clear he’s managed to maintain creativity, with ‘Fire’ featuring Elderbrook, ‘Higher Ground’ and ‘Drown’ all landing this year. “The only upside of this is that I’ve got to spend so much time in the studio,” he tells DJ Mag about the COVID-19 lockdown. “But I do have to say that I miss being able to be together in the studio with artists I collaborate with. For example, ‘Fire’ with Elderbrook was made almost completely via WhatsApp and FaceTime. I absolutely loved working with him and I love the end result, but I wish we could have experienced that magical studio moment together.”
 
Garrix also says that the break from touring has afforded him some much-needed down-time, including the chance to spend a lot of time windsurfing. “It has helped me to wind down,” he explains. “I’ve had my first actual holiday in years and being on the water helps me to shut off my thoughts and only focus on one thing.” 
Looking to the future, Garrix says he has some very exciting projects in the pipeline that he can’t reveal the details of yet, but adds that he feels like he’s been “making some of the best music I’ve ever made the last couple of months. It’s coming your way soon!”
 
 
What three things have most helped you through coronavirus lockdown?

“Friends, family and music.”
  
What lessons should the industry learn from this crisis?
 
“I think lots of organisations and artists have shown their creativity in the past couple of months, which is amazing. Also for me, I’ve learned that sometimes it’s good to hit the pause button and take some time off.”
 
What steps need to be taken to address the racism in the dance music scene?
 
“It’s very important to continue addressing these issues. Keep the conversation going.”
 
What industry changes are you personally pushing for to make the dance music scene more inclusive?
 
“I always treat people around me the way I want to be treated myself. With STMPD RCRDS we’re really trying to showcase a diverse array of artists, no matter what genre, background etc. Same goes for the people I work with. However, I do think this is definitely something we need to keep working on and can improve to hopefully lead by example in the future.”
 
What’s the greatest dance music track of all time?
 
“There are so many great ones, so that’s very hard, but ‘Levels’ by Avicii is still one of my favourites of all time.”

Questions Top100 DJs 2004 - Becca Antoon - 2020-10-20 09:56

Style: 
“Electronic/pop music.”
Best known for: 
“Three times No.1 on the DJ Mag Top 100. ‘Summer Days’, ‘In The Name Of Love’, ‘Scared To Be Lonely’, ‘Drown’, ‘Animals’. Official music artist of EURO2020.”
Tune of the year: 
“Loopers feat. Iyona ‘Fire & Rain’.”

Poll 2020: Nora En Pure

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Nora En Pure
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When Nora En Pure stepped up to the carnivalesque decks at Tomorrowland in 2019, the crowd were taken gently by the hand: rather than the buzzsaw Technicolor riffs of mainstream EDM, Nora En Pure opened her set with a lilting, simple piano track, building into a deep house set of pretty melodies, woodwind hooks and warm, low-rumbling bass. The Swiss-South African DJ and producer is known for her emotive style of songwriting — her videos are set on mountains and in woodlands. “I always like to have a strong nature focus, using sounds of wildlife or organic instruments that create a sense of wanderlust while keeping it crisp and tight,” she once said.

Nora En Pure’s reputation has grown massively in the last few years: playing festivals like Ultra Music and Coachella and her residencies at Privilege Ibiza and Marquee Dayclub, but also through her weekly radio show, Purified Radio. Well past her 200th episode now, she plays a variety of deep house, including music by the Enormous Tunes label family. 

Questions Top100 DJs 2004 - Becca Antoon - 2020-10-20 09:45

Style: 
Deep house

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