Poll Clubs 2009: Club JB's | DJMag.com Skip to main content
Club JB's
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Ask any genuine DJ's DJ and they will tell you much the same. For all the egocentric electricity that comes with playing those big arenas, huge festival stages and massive concert halls, they will never beat the connection of sharing their music with an intimate room packed with real music lovers.

No bullshit, no fireworks, no passengers, that is precisely the experience at Nagoya's JB - a 300-capacity, 10-year plus institution in the nation's third most populous city.

"You can't beat the intimacy of having people right next to you when you play and that's what it's like at JB's," confirms Matt Edwards, aka Rekids boss Radio Slave. "It's like going back to playing house parties, which is what we all started out doing in the first place."

Much of JB's charm is down to its location. Or rather lack of it. Lying inconspicuously on a humdrum street at 4-3-15 Sakae, on Nagoya's outskirts, there is no effort to draw attention to itself and inside the back-to-basics aesthetic continues.

"The room itself is nothing much," continues Matt. "It's just a small rectangular room with the DJ booth at the front. But the soundsystem is ridiculous. It's a proper audiophile system that just gives everything you play so much extra character."

Running since 1997, JB's has been dedicated to giving underground electronic music a forum in this city from day dot.

In the early days, the techno old guard of Jeff Mills, Carl Cox, Derrick May and Stacy Pullen were booked, later NYC house legends like Frankie Knuckles, Kerri Chandler and David Morales, and more recently everyone from François K and Jerome Sydenham to Modeselektor and Matthew Dear.

But none of these names would mean anything if it wasn't for the crowd. There for the music first and foremost, their knowledge is so obsessively studious it is like playing in an alien dimension. Whatever the genre, their enthusiasm remains stoked from start to finish.

"As the night progresses you really start connecting with the crowd and can express yourself as a DJ," explains Matt. "You can play everything from classic NYC house to old Carl Craig favourites to really obscure disco and they'll come with you. Not only that, they'll know exactly what you're playing too.

"When you play in Europe or the UK, people are out on a Friday or Saturday night to get wasted," adds Matt. "To a degree it doesn't matter what they're listening to, it's just fodder for their ears whilst they're getting smashed. In Japan, they know every single record you have made inside out. The requests I get at the end of the night are ridiculous - they want things you made years ago, unreleased tracks, it's mad."

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BERGHAIN
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FABRIC
3
SPACE IBIZA
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WOMB
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AMNESIA
6
MINISTRY OF SOUND
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PACHA IBIZA
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WATERGATE
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D-EDGE
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The End
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Cocoon
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GUVERNMENT
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ZOUK SINGAPORE
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SUB CLUB
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WARUNG
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SANKEYS MCR
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DC-10
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SIRENA
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Paradiso
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Pacha Buenos Aires
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ROBERT JOHNSON
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Ruby Skye
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Matter
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The Arches
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Space Miami
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Club Volume
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Pacha Miami
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AGEHA
32
Hardpop
33
RAZZMATAZZ
34
CIELO
35
Eden
36
Alte Börse
37
The Rex
38
Batofar
39
Studio Martin
40
Avalon
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Club JB's
42
My House
43
CAVO PARADISO
44
FABRIK
45
Noxx
46
TENAX CLUB
47
Fuse
48
Clash Club
49
PRIVILEGE
50
Onzi-eme
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ANZUCLUB
52
52 Crystal
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Vanguard
54
Villa
55
Metro City
56
Kristal
57
Club Midi
58
360°
59
Harry Klein
60
MANSION
61
Circa
62
ARMA 17
63
Club Der Visionaere
64
Vision
65
Vinyl
66
Caves
67
CHINESE LAUNDRY
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Goa Club
69
Stereo
70
Bar 25
71
Byblos
72
Warehouse
73
Heaven
74
Air
75
Florida 135
76
Culture Box
77
MINT CLUB
78
Dirty Dancing
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Circus Afterhours
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81
Cabaret Voltaire
82
Pacha Sharm
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1015
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Haoman 17
85
Prince Of Wales Bandroom
86
Numero Uno
87
MOTION
88
Barfly
89
Café D'Anvers
90
Stiff Kitten
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Factory Club
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TRESOR
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Global
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YALTA
96
LUX FRAGIL
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Sq Klub
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Le Queen
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Weekend
100
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